Women and Today’s Culture

glass ceiling, generations, baby boomers

Today’s culture will make a change on its own when it comes to men and women and their resilience and success in the workplace. Today’s culture calls for more empathy, nurturing careers and listening to employees.

Never before, have there been 4 generations in the workplace all speaking a different language with different motivators as to why they are there and how they create value for the organization.

I am finding in my consulting engagements that men are having a more difficult time with managing the generation gap. Not because they don’t have the skill set but because many of them still believe in a hierarchal style of management or that women are not equal to men when it comes to experience and ability. Especially many male baby boomers, who are still caught up in how they were treated or better yet how they rose to their current positions. They want their subordinates, especially the Millenniums to adhere to this same principal.

Unfortunately this just doesn’t work and talent is lost as a result of that. Women on the other hand just naturally possess a more nurturing attitude, empathy and the patience to listen. Perhaps it is because they themselves have struggled for acceptance and acknowledgement. I’m not suggesting that they mother these quick witted, sometimes impatient entitlement acting Millenniums, I am saying that they have a wiser way of hearing them out and coaching them in what they need.

We all wake up in the morning and turn off our alarm clock and tune into station WIIFM. “What’s In It For Me”? These are called our intrinsic motivators, it’s what makes us get up in the morning go to work and “kick some…..” It’s when we get to work and those motivators are compromised that we turn up the sound of station WIIFM and tune others , often our supervisors, out. The workplace is full of everyone wanting what they want and it’s all based on what they value and that is what initiates their behavior.

In my coaching and consulting experience I find that men have more difficulty “giving them what they need” versus “giving them what they want them to have”. Women on the other hand have figured out that if you can create a motivating environment by listening to what employees need to be productive, they are able to keep all 4 generations feeling valued.

This is why I believe the culture itself will make a change as women will eventually make their way up the ladder and they will be much more effective as leaders. Ultimately this will cause the gender gap to narrow. Not every organization will embrace this and not every male manager is stuck in the behavioral model they learned. I was fortunate to have worked in an organization in my mid-twenties and broke through the glass ceiling thanks to some wonderful male role models.

My advice to women is to not get caught up in “this glass ceiling affect”. Do your job well, expect to be recognized and you will be. It is changing, perhaps not fast enough but I guarantee you that the younger generation in the workplace does not see gender, they see talent and equality and one day they will be running our organizations. Hang in there…a change is gonna come.

-Sharon Jenks, President of The Jenks Group, Inc. http://www.thejenksgroup.com

 

The Right Way to Fire Employees

“I’ve seen many a CEO take a bullet themselves because they did not fire the unmotivated and incompetent thinking they could reform, retrain, and remotivate people who either don’t know or don’t care, or both. This is a great article worth the read.” – Sharon Jenks

 

In my years of experience in the C-suite, I’ve met and worked with every kind of personality out there, from big and brash know-it-all executives to quietly confident managers who fly below the radar — and always get the job done.

But I’ve never known anyone who likes to use the “f” word.

Not that “f” word. The one I’m referring to here is “fired,” as in, “You are.”

Even Donald Trump, who has added to his fame and fortune by making “You’re fired!” his catch phrase (something I have first-hand experience with from my time on “Celebrity Apprentice”) doesn’t always relish the idea of letting someone go.

One of the most authentic, radically transparent people I know, Trump didn’t get to where he is today by playing small, avoiding risk, and hoping things will get better. And as a change agent whose job it is to overhaul your company in a way that is massive and measurable, nor should you.

No matter what business you’re in, the key to your success will always be the quality of the people on your team. From your front-line foot soldiers to the back-room strategists, in order for your company to succeed in the cutthroat world of business, you have to know that every one of them is ready, willing, and able to go the distance with you.

If not, it’s time to fire the dead weight and hire new blood. It’s easy to say and hard to put into practice, but it’s crucial to your success.

How crucial?

In my bestselling book, “Running the Gauntlet,” I talk a great deal about the importance of changing a mood of a company as a necessary first step towards changing its culture.
And integral to changing the mood is making sure you’ve got the right people in place.

Avoid firing people, and you might as well try to teach a pig to kiss

Anytime I’m invited to speak to an audience of C-suite execs about turning around a company, effecting massive change, and reaping the financial rewards that come as a result, I always get a chuckle when I liken holding onto employees that no longer fit in with the vision you have for your company to teaching pigs to kiss. As I point out, you can do it, but it’s a messy job.

And it really pisses off the pig.

It’s far easier (and a lot cleaner) to get rid of those employees who aren’t working and trade up for talent that will. This involves identifying those who can’t (or won’t) change as well as those who don’t believe that they need to change in order to be successful, and then firing them.

You hear talk all the time about how hiring the right people is an art, and there’s a lot of wisdom to that statement. But the flip side to that coin is the art of firing those who can’t handle the course to success you’ve charted.

If you’re not there already, chances are good that the time is coming when you’ll need to make some tough decisions about who to keep on and who to let go. Like others in your position, you might find yourself hemming and hawing over your decision, finding every excuse in the book to avoid actually taking action.

These excuses run the gamut, with executives citing everything from the high cost of searching for new talent or the effect of unemployment on insurance costs, to the fact that deep down, they are holding out hope that with a little bit of help or retraining, under-performers will somehow change to become star employees. And then there’s the fear of making a mistake in firing someone and the fear of how letting people go will make the company look to those on the outside.

Yes, yes, yes. Blah, blah, blah.

The truth of the matter is, if someone’s not a right fit, they need to go. Yesterday. When I’ve had to make personnel changes, once the dust has settled I have never felt I made a mistake in firing someone. In fact, more often than not, I often think I should have done it sooner.

It’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it: Three steps to firing with confidence

If the writing’s on the wall for some of the employees at your company, now’s the time to take immediate and decisive action to trim the fat and make room for new talent.

Yes, it’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it. If that someone is you, use my three-step process for making the job as painless — and effective — a proposition as you can for all involved:

Be clear on your conditions of satisfaction first
No matter what your battle plan for success is, or who it involves, a necessary first step is that you get very clear on your conditions for satisfaction, and then share these with your team.

These are so important to your company’s success that I spend a considerable amount of time on the subject in both “Running the Gauntlet” and my earlier book, “The Mirror Test.” Without clearly defined conditions of satisfaction, you miss out on a few key ingredients to success:

  • You won’t be able to sell your endgame to your people.
  • You won’t have a prayer of tackling head-on those feelings that often blind your people to the fact that change is needed — or to the reality that it’s time for some of them to move on.
  • You won’t have any way of pinpointing what your desired end result looks like or knowing whether or not something is working to keep you on track.

When you align your teams around the company’s conditions of satisfaction, you build a foundation for success. Those that get your vision will serve as a cornerstone for that success; those that don’t, won’t. Identifying and sharing your conditions of satisfaction brings into focus who falls into these categories, making it easier for you to decide who to keep and who to let go.

Gather feedback from the rank and file
One of the easiest ways I’ve found to identify who’s pulling their weight and who’s dead weight in a company is by asking your best employees. As with everything else, there’s an art to this (you don’t want your employees to feel like tattletales). The best approach is to ask them honestly and to let them know that what they share with you is in confidence.

I’ve found that asking trusted employees for this kind of information not only makes the process that much more fool-proof (how often have you had someone come up to you after you’ve fired one of their colleagues to confirm that you made the right choice?) but also empowers your best people who are honored to have earned your trust.

And I don’t know about you, but those are exactly the kind of people I want to go into battle with, confident that they’ve got my back, just as I’ve got theirs.

Stop thinking about “why not,” and act!
My friend Miles Young, Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide’s CEO, once told me that whenever he sees anything that’s not working in business, the first thing he does is to take a look at the people around the problem. “Things don’t break by themselves,” Young said, “they get broken as a result of negligence or mistakes.”

Once you’ve laid out your conditions for satisfaction, you know where those conditions aren’t being met, and you have identified the people around the problem, as Young puts it, it’s time to take action. No more beating around the bush, thinking of all the reasons why not to let someone go. A company can only move as fast as its lowest common denominator, which means if you’re going to succeed, you’ve got to let go of those who aren’t cutting it.

If firing people isn’t your thing, get someone to do it for you. However you go about it, get it done. Nothing negatively affects a company’s morale like employees who aren’t a good fit, and chances are those who need to be fired already know that they’re the odd man out living on borrowed time as it is. Giving them the push out the door into something bigger and better won’t just improve the performance of those who stay to build the company; it could be exactly what the person you’ve let go needs in order to grow.

Give your company a fighting chance to succeed

There’s an old saying that goes, “An army marches on its stomach.” These days, while you might not literally be leading troops into battle, you are waging war on a battleground of sorts: the marketplace.

This means that your army feeds on trust and empowerment. And if it’s going to march at all, it’s got to march in unison.

Fill your rank and file with those who share your vision and are ready and willing to follow you into battle, and fire the others. In doing so, you’ll give your company the fighting chance it needs to succeed on today’s battlefield.

Jeffrey Hayzlett is a global business celebrity, TV commentator, bestselling author, and sometimes cowboy.

 

What It Takes to Be a Boss Every Employee Loves

takes-boss-everyone-loves, leadership, relationships, behavior

Being a successful leader means being good at what you do and possessing integrity. But more than anything, it’s about your ability to build healthy relationships with others — particularly those who work for you.

As an entrepreneur, you’re viewed differently than you were when you were a manager or colleague in a traditional job. You stand to gain the most from the company’s success, and it is easier for your employees to think you’re more interested in the business than them and their lives. Your success is paramount, but it shouldn’t be achieved at the expense of healthy relationships with those you depend on.

1. Don’t treat people as transactions.
Years ago in my first real job out of college, I was delighted to have my very own assistant. She was a very capable and competent woman who I really liked. One day while a client was visiting the office, I made the naïve mistake of introducing my assistant by saying, “This is Teri. She works for me.” Teri’s response would have served me better in private, but her point was valid none-the-less: “I work with you, Mark, not for you.”

I meant no ill respect with my choice of words, but it suggested to Teri that she was a means to an end, that I was “above” her. And while technically she did report to me, the difference between working for and with someone is critical. The former can make a person feel conquered, while the latter signals collaboration.

Think through how you title and refer to your employees. Focus on reciprocity: look for ways you can help them achieve their work-life goals while they help you achieve yours. And guard against letting tasks trump a true regard and appreciation for the relationship you have with those who have voluntarily chosen to work with you.

2. Invest in those you value.
The ultimate test of value in a relationship is how much time, interest and support you are willing to invest. Rather than ask, “What have you done for me lately?” turn the tables and ask yourself what you’ve done lately for those you truly value.

Here’s one way to invest for great dividends: identify the potential in an employee that he or she doesn’t recognize in him- or herself. Often people are blind to their own abilities or potential, and good leaders not only recognize these latent strengths, they help develop them.

Several years ago, my office manager was spending more time on our website and technology platforms. A colleague was presenting a multi-day event in Las Vegas that I knew would give my team member information and skills to help her in these areas. Going to Las Vegas for the event was an added perk, so I gladly paid for the seminar and trip. She came back better equipped for her work, knowing I was willing to invest in her success.

3. Be involved, but know your limits.

You can work in the same office space with people every day and still be absent because you are preoccupied with your own worries. An open door policy means nothing if you don’t stop what you’re doing long enough to give your attention to those who walk through it.

How can you do this? Make it a point to “check in” with every employee each day. That means a simple but sincere question: “How are things going?” Listen and if necessary, probe for information you can use to support your employees. Identify frustrations they are facing, opportunities they’ve recognized and gauge their emotional energy and commitment to their work.

You’ll know you’re micromanaging when you’re spending more time telling someone how to do something than you are in clarifying what needs to be done. A thorough explanation with a chance to ask questions is vastly different than a droning presentation about how you’d do it. Give people the freedom to achieve the best results in their own way.

4. Show your gratitude.
I’ve heard a lot of complaints from employees who feel underappreciated by their manager, but I’ve never heard anyone complain they were recognized, rewarded or appreciated too much. I’m puzzled at why so many entrepreneurs and leaders are reticent to voice appreciation. Don’t be afraid of over-doing it. You connect with people more deeply when you recognize the best in them and let them know.

Here’s a powerful way to show appreciation: When you get feedback from a customer about someone on your team who has done a great job, get their permission to record it. Then play the recording at the next team meeting. There is even more power in a customer’s expression of a job well done than simply acknowledging it yourself.

Growing your business successfully means doing all that you can to make your team want to work their hardest for your cause. That means connecting with employees in a meaningful way.

By Mark Sanborn  an author, speaker and president of Sanborn & Associates Inc., a leadership development firm based in Lonetree, Colo.

What do you do to deepen your connections with employees?