Don’t Lose Your Year-End Bonus! Maximize It By Becoming An Intrapreneur

MoneyHere is some little-known information, and an innovation tool, that will help you get rewarded for your actions.

An intrapreneur is an internal entrepreneur. As an intrapreneur, you must begin to think and act like an owner or senior executive, even though you were originally hired to perform within a more narrow job description, which you’re probably already doing well enough. The purpose of this article is to help you immediately do one thing outside of your current assignment that will add surprising value to the company, thus qualifying you for a maximum year end bonus, or pay raise, or maybe even a promotion (if you can make this a habit). Sound good? Let’s go.

Intrapreneurs are innovators. They bring positive change in areas critical to the success of the organization. As an intrapreneur, you create value by innovating in one of four ways. You can:

  • Increase Revenues
  • Decrease costs
  • Streamline processes
  • Solve problems

Innovation opportunities abound in every organization, and you can engage in one of them right now through a simple, four-step process.

Step 1. Identify an innovation option that would add value. Look around. Ask your peers, subordinates, and superiors. Go online and explore these topics. It should take you about ten minutes to identify something that could be improved. We have taken thousands of people through this process in training sessions, and we have never seen a group come up short on innovation ideas.

Step 2. Create a professional-looking innovation proposal. You can do this using a free online tool that will make you look like a financial genius. This tool will automatically calculate key financial measures such as Implementation Cost, Break Even Point, Return on Investment, Internal Rate of Return, Net Present Value, and Sales Equivalency. If the numbers don’t look good, don’t submit the proposal. If there is value in your idea, you will have provided all of the financial information necessary for management to accept it.

Step 3. Get your proposal approved. I suggest that, rather than taking your idea to your direct supervisor, you should aim higher in the ORG chart. Minimally, you should take it to you boss’s boss, but the higher the better. That’s because there tends to be greater appreciation for business improvements with upper management. Also, when senior leaders recognize you for your intrapreneurial contributions, it’s easier for your boss to support your increased compensation. An alternate strategy would be to work together with your boss on your idea so you can share the credit and build a more collaborative relationship that will serve you both well in the future.

Step 4. Help implement your innovation. Improvement ideas are worthless without execution; therefore, you should act with a sense of urgency to turn your innovation proposal into real change that starts to add value. In cases where the implementation is assigned to someone else, or the time required to make the change is longer than you would like, you should still benefit from your efforts come bonus time.

Bottom line: Leaders need intrapreneurs that can improve the bottom line. You can do this right now to help ensure your year-end bonus, and you should also consider becoming a life-long intrapreneur in order to boost your career in the long run. -Forbes Magazine

Five Ways To Be Amazing At Work

StarIn every company, there are a few employees who stand out. They’re the ones who always finish first, get recognized for their accomplishments and eventually make their way up the ranks. Invariably, they know how to play the political game. But there are other qualities that world-class performers have in common. Here’s how you can be one of them.

1. Be obsessed with productivity. The best employees tend to work in jobs and businesses they love. As a result, thoughts of how to be more successful and productive rarely leave their mind. In fact, the great ones have to force themselves into non-work activities just to give their mind a chance to rest and recover.

2. Solve problems. Problem solving is the cornerstone of commerce. Average employees tend to spend more time jockeying for position to gain favor from their superiors than they do solving problems. Great ones are not interested in management kudos; they are interested in results. World-class managers and employees solve problems quickly and move on to solving bigger, more complex problems, whether individually or as part of a team.

3. Take risks. The most common commodity in corporate America is the sales manager who craves the approval and friendship of his sales team. The second most common commodity is the sales manager who rules her team with an iron fist, refusing to consider feedback or input from the field.

World-class leaders are neither dictators nor micromanagers. Instead, they have two primary objectives: increase revenues and bring out the best in the people they lead. That might mean being unpopular and pushing people beyond their comfort zones, or being there for a team member who has hit rock bottom. These leaders can adapt to any situation. The great ones never play it safe when it comes to leading their teams through change, knowing their job is to serve as a guide and coach.

4. Have a strong work ethic. Amateurs work just hard enough to escape being fired. They expect to be compensated for every little thing they do – if they can be over-compensated, even better.

The pros have exactly the opposite mindset. They understand that the marketplace will richly reward a world-class work ethic with an endless stream of opportunities. This work ethic is the reason so many immigrants come to the free world and become millionaires. They’re so grateful for the opportunity to work hard that no one can convince them to slow down.

5. Find a coach. Corporate America and entrepreneurs are starting to catch on to something that athletes have always known: if you want to maximize your potential in anything, hire a coach. Coaching is to performance what leadership is to an organization. Since human beings are primarily emotional creatures, competent coaches are experts in stoking the fires that burn within. The more coachable and open-minded your employees, the better they’ll perform.

Trouble is, ego can get in the way. The best employees are the most open to world-class coaching. They don’t care about ego satisfaction when it comes to improving their results; all they’re looking for is an edge, no matter how slight. When two companies or opponents go head-to-head, many times the only thing that favors the winner is a slight edge in thinking, strategy and technique.

From: http://www.mentaltoughnesssecrets.com/

11 Attributes of Leadership

Napoleon HillI have had the great privilege and good fortune to work with and for leaders  who inspire with their words and most importantly, their actions. But  unfortunately, far too many people in leadership roles are ill-equipped to lead  with effectiveness.

What follows is excerpted from Think and Grow Rich, written by  Napoleon Hill and published in 1938. Read the book if you haven’t already. It’s  essential and inspirational, and should be read by all who partake in  business.

11 Major Attributes of Leadership

  1. Willingness to Assume Full Responsibility. The successful  leader must be willing to assume responsibility for the mistakes and the  shortcomings of her followers. If she tries to shift the responsibility, she  will not remain the leader. If one of her followers makes a mistake, and shows  herself incompetent, the leader must consider that it is she who failed.
  2. Definiteness of Decision. The person who wavers in her  decisions shows that she is not sure of herself. She cannot lead others  successfully.
  3. 11 Attributes of Leadership image leadership Lincoln 267x300Definiteness  of Plans. The successful leader must plan her work, and work her plan.  A leader who moves by guesswork, without practical, definite plans, is  comparable to a ship without a rudder. Sooner or later she will land on the  rocks.
  4. Unwavering Courage based upon knowledge of self, and of  one’s occupation. No follower wishes to be led by a leader who lacks  self-confidence and courage.
  5. A Keen Sense of Justice. Without a sense of fairness and  justice, no leader can command and retain the respect of her followers. Leadership-Ghadi-235x300
  6. Cooperation. The successful leader must understand and  apply the principle of cooperative effort and be able to induce her followers to  do the same. Leadership calls for POWER, and power calls for COOPERATION.
  7. Self Control. The person who cannot control herself can  never control others. Self-control sets a mighty example for one’s  followers.
  8. The Habit of Doing More Than Paid For. One of the penalties  of leadership is the necessity of willingness upon the part of the leader to do  more than she requires of her followers.
  9. A Pleasing Personality. No slovenly, careless, or  unpleasant person can become a successful leader. Leadership calls for  respect.
  10. Sympathy and Understanding. The successful leader must be  in sympathy with her followers. Moreover, she must understand them and their  problems.
  11. Mastery of Detail. Successful leadership calls for mastery  of details of the leader’s position.

Hill writes the following in an afterword to this list. Remember, this was  written 75 years ago: “The relation of employer and employee, or of  leader and follower, in the future, will be one of mutual cooperation, based  upon an equitable division of the profits of business. In the future, the  relationship of employer and employee will be more like a partnership then it  has been in the past.”

Wishful thinking, perhaps? Collectively, it would appear that we still have a  lot of work to do. -Matt Laddin

5 Things Super Successful People Do Before 8 AM

Thatcher-locRise and shine! Morning time just became your new best friend. Love it or hate it, utilizing the morning hours before work may be the key to a successful and healthy lifestyle. That’s right, early rising is a common trait found in many CEOs, government officials, and other influential people. Margaret Thatcher was up every day at 5 a.m.; Frank Lloyd Wright at 4 am and Robert Iger, the CEO of Disney wakes at 4:30am just to name a few. I know what you’re thinking – you do your best work at night. Not so fast. According to Inc. Magazine, morning people have been found to be more proactive and more productive. In addition, the health benefits for those with a life before work go on and on. Let’s explore 5 of the things successful people do before 8 am.

Working out

2. Map Out Your Day. Maximize your potential by mapping out your schedule for the day, as well as your goals and to dos. The morning is a good time for this as it is often one of the only quiet times a person gets throughout the day. The early hours foster easier reflection that helps when prioritizing your activities. They also allow for uninterrupted problem solving when trying to fit everything into your timetable. While scheduling, don’t forget about your mental health. Plan a 10 minute break after that stressful meeting for a quick walk around the block or a moment of meditation at your desk. Trying to eat healthy? Schedule a small window in the evening to pack a few nutritious snacks to bring to work the next day.

healthy_breakfast_meals

3. Eat a Healthy Breakfast. We all know that rush out the door with a cup of coffee and an empty stomach feeling. You sit down at your desk, and you’re already wondering how early that taco truck sets up camp outside your office. No good. Take that extra time in the morning to fuel your body for the tasks ahead of it. It will help keep your mind on what’s at hand and not your growling stomach. Not only is breakfast good for your physical health, it is also a good time to connect socially. Even five minutes of talking with your kids or spouse while eating a quick bowl of oatmeal can boost your spirits before heading out the door.

visualization

4. Visualization. These days we talk about our physical health ad nauseam, but sometimes our mental health gets overlooked. The morning is the perfect time to spend some quiet time inside your mind meditating or visualizing. Take a moment to visualize your day ahead of you, focusing on the successes you will have. Even just a minute of visualization and positive thinking can help improve your mood and outlook on your work load for the day.

guy on ladder

5. Make Your Day Top Heavy. We all have that one item on our to do list that we dread. It looms over you all day (or week) until you finally suck it up and do it after much procrastination. Here’s an easy tip to save yourself the stress – do that least desirable task on your list first. Instead of anticipating the unpleasantness of it from first coffee through your lunch break, get it out of the way. The morning is the time when you are (generally) more well rested and your energy level is up. Therefore, you are more well equipped to handle more difficult projects. And look at it this way, your day will get progressively easier, not the other way around. By the time your work day is ending, you’re winding down with easier to dos and heading into your free time more relaxed. Success! – Forbes Magazine

7 Things I Wish I Had Known at 25

 

work-advice-known-25-ftrWe’ve all had transformative moments.

You know what I’m talking about: those brief instances when you find yourself reflecting on lessons you’ve learned over the years. They may come professionally or personally. Sometimes they’re huge life lessons that really shake things up. Other times, they’re small things that are easily forgotten if not put to use.

I’m a firm believer that no one’s born a leader or expert. It’s the experiences we encounter that help transform us into better, brighter, and more successful versions of ourselves. For me, I started out as an entrepreneur, a move made with little thought at the nontraditional age of 16. Today, my experiences as a serial entrepreneur, CEO, leader, father, and husband have taught me a lot.

But imagine if you could bundle up the key lessons you’ve learned in your professional years and hand them to those just starting out. I want to do just that.

Here are seven things I’ve learned professionally that I was fortunate to gain, but wish I had known when I was just starting out:

1. Proactivity is a secret weapon. There’s this general stereotype I want to put an end to immediately: Jobs aren’t about waiting around and doing things as they’re assigned. Far too many people—even those with passion to spare—fall into this trap.

Begin building your proactive habits as soon as possible by seeking out ways to go above and beyond your role every day. This could mean kicking your projects to the next level, finding new ways to impact your company, or even just improving internal processes to make things run smoother. Proactivity is a crucial part of advancing your career.

2. Perfection isn’t attainable. Being a perfectionist and micromanaging others—even if they aren’t your direct reports—can be damaging. These are two things I personally struggled with early on. I learned quickly that people don’t like being told what to do, and good leadership and management don’t come from tweaking things to perfection. Instead, I learned to live by the 80/20 rule and ask questions to derive answers when it comes to managing others.

3. Great public speaking skills create influence. When I was just starting out, I had a mentor who took me under his wing. Tom Antion was a successful entrepreneur and great public speaker, but I never thought much of it until the time came for me to really dive into public speaking.

It’s important to understand that those who can speak well, be it in a company meeting or at a presentation, typically become trusted leaders. Never stop improving as a public speaker, even if it’s something you initially fear. If you have a strong voice and show confidence, authority will follow.

4. Work isn’t just about cashing your paycheck. If you’re in it for the money alone, you’re probably not going to get very far. Work is truly about passion—finding and doing what you love. Being driven by passion is an insanely beneficial motivator.

So, if you’re not passionate about the job you’re doing today, what can you do to find your passion? Would it be a new job? What about a new role within your company? Whatever it takes, find and pursue your passion sooner rather than later.

5. Seek out a mentor. As I stated above, I was fortunate enough to have started and fueled my career due to the guidance of a great mentor. If you don’t already have a mentor, it’s time to go out and find one.

You may find a mentor in someone within your company or a person you look up to in your industry. If you don’t already know of someone who would make a great mentor, there are plenty of websites, organizations, conferences and networking events that can hook you up with someone who shares your professional vision and can offer helpful advice.

6. Know what makes you better than the rest. The days of fitting into a professional mold are dead and gone.

Today, knowing what sets you apart from the crowd professionally is the way to build your career. Knowing your top skills and using them to establish your personal brand will catch the eye of employers and maybe even lead you to starting a business of your own.

7. Always risk it. We all know that risks and rewards go hand-in-hand. If you aren’t open to taking the occasional risk, you’re likely to get stuck in a flow that you can’t break from. This doesn’t always mean starting your own business or quitting your job for something less conventional. Taking risks often means overcoming your fears and reaching for opportunities you may have overlooked with more thinking.

I wish I had known these seven lessons when I was 25, but I’m thankful to be able to share them regardless. One thing’s for certain: there is never any time to stop learning and growing as a professional. -Ilya Pozin

What do you wish you had known professionally in your 20s?

How to Eliminate Habits Holding You Back From Success

how-eliminate-habits-holding-back-successHumans love routine. When it comes to achieving measurable goals,  this means we tend to do what we’ve always done, how we’ve always done it, in  the same order as always.

This also goes for our habits when working in teams. You’ve  probably been working with your team long enough to feel like you know what to  expect from them. You’ve developed habitual patterns in the way you interact  together. And probably, the feeling is mutual. Maybe it’s time to shake up those  impressions.

To be a better manager, it’s important to take risks and introduce needed  improvements. This often means identifying what’s working and what needs  improvement. Sometimes discovering those specifics is as simple as asking three  questions:

  1. What habits have gotten you where you are today?
  2. What habits may be holding you  back from reaching your next desired  accomplishments?
  3. Is it time to ask for feedback?

Taking a close look at your habits provides wonderful insight into what has  worked so far. It allows you to make conscious changes. My friend and mentor,  Marshall Goldsmith, wrote a book whose title says it all: What Got You Here Won’t Get You There. What habits are  you currently using that might be keeping you from reaching your next level of  accomplishments?

Here are a  few places to start: Do you start meetings on time? Do you  listen to comments fully without interrupting? Do you ask clarifying questions?  Do you look at the person talking or keep your eyes on your digital device? Do  you offer acknowledgement for a job well done or for new ideas? What habits have  you gotten into that serve you well? What habits need to be changed to help you  move forward?

Next, ask yourself what you’re doing that is getting in the way of achieving  your goals. I know an entrepreneur who recently realized he was using the first  hour of his day to try and catch up on email and touch all his social media  profiles. As a five-day experiment one week, he focused that hour in the morning  only on reaching out to new vendors to support his buisiness. This one simple  change allowed him to move his launch date up by three full weeks.

One way to discover what is and isn’t working well when it comes to your  habits is to ask for feedback from those around you. Asking for feedback won’t  signal that something is wrong. Rather, it shows you are open to new ideas and  approaches.

Asking for feedback can also fast-track your efforts. Feedback can maximize  your focus, energy and time so that you get more of the right things done. Time  and again, I’ve seen how entrepreneurs who were doing fairly well managed to  supersize their productivity and get even more out of their day and efforts  simply by being receptive to a bit of feedback.

To know if your habits are working or not, clearly define the results you  want. When you fully understand what you want to accomplish, you can reflect on  how your actions over the past few hours, days or weeks can get you closer to  your goal. -Jason W. Womack